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this is an image of the Eiffel Tower in paris, france

Place de la Concorde

Place de la Concorde is the largest public square in Paris. Situated along the Seine in the 1st and 8th arrondissement, it separates the Tuileries Gardens from the beginning of the boulevard Champs-Elysées.

Address: Place de la Concorde, 75008, Paris France
Area: Opéra
Arrondissement: 1st/8th
Opening times: All day every day
Transport: M° (Métro) - Concorde (lines 1, 8, 12); Bus: lines 24, 42, 52, 72, 73, 84, 94
Entry Cost: Free of charge

History of Place de la Concorde

With a total surface area of about 904,170 square feet, the Place de la Concorde is today the largest and probably the most famous square in Paris. Construction of this octagonal square began in 1748. While it was built to receive an equestrian statue of King Louis XV, the actual underlying goal was to develop the huge wasteland that separated the Tuileries Gardens from the Champs-Elysées. Place Louis XV was finished in 1763, and was the setting of some tragic events in the following years. First, in 1770, a fireworks display in honor of the marriage of Marie-Antoinette to the heir apparent, the future King Louis XVI, resulted in a terrible stampede that cost the lives of 132 spectators.

A few years later, re-baptized Place de la Révolution, it was used as an execution site where a guillotine replaced the royal statue. More than 1,000 people were beheaded there, including Louis XVI, in January 1793, and Marie-Antoinette, in October 1793. The noted revolutionaries Danton and Robespierre were later to meet the same fate, as they became the victims of their own fanaticism. This infamous setting was given the new name 'Place de la Concorde' under the Directoire regime (1795-99). In 1836, King Louis-Philippe erected one of two existing obelisks from the temple of Luxor, at the center of the square. He had received the 3,300-year-old, 75-ft tall, 254-ton monument as a gift from Pasha Muhammad-Ali, the Viceroy of Egypt. It took no less than 4 years to transport this column from Egypt to Pari